Japanese naval vessels of World War Two as seen by U.S. Naval Intelligence

Cover of: Japanese naval vessels of World War Two as seen by U.S. Naval Intelligence |

Published by Naval Institute Press in Annapolis, Md .

Written in English

Read online

Places:

  • Japan.

Subjects:

  • Warships -- Recognition -- Japan.,
  • World War, 1939-1945 -- Naval operations, Japanese.

Edition Notes

Reprint. Originally published: Washington : Division of Naval Intelligence, Identification and Characteristics Section, 1942-1943.

Book details

Statementintroduction by A.D. Baker III.
ContributionsUnited States. Office of Naval Intelligence.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsVA653 .A48 1987
The Physical Object
Paginationca. 500 p. :
Number of Pages500
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2744895M
ISBN 100870213148
LC Control Number86063361

Download Japanese naval vessels of World War Two as seen by U.S. Naval Intelligence

The book is a reference guide for the recognition of Japanese naval vessels which points out in much detail their characteristics. It also includes several "supplemental" publications which are described below. The original was held together with a shoe string.

When new pages were added, you untied the string and inserted the new or updated info/5(4). ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Reprint. Originally published by U.S. Division of Naval Intelligence as ONIIndex to all Japanese naval vessels; ONIJapanese naval vessels; ONI J, Japanese submarines; ONI J, Japanese landing operations and equipment.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Japanese naval vessels of World War Two as seen by U.S. Naval Intelligence.

Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, Originally published by U.S. Division of Naval Intelligence as ONIIndex to all Japanese naval vessels; ONIJapanese naval vessels; ONI J, Japanese submarines; Japanese naval vessels of World War Two as seen by U.S. Naval Intelligence book J, Japanese landing operations and equipment.

Japanese Naval Vessels of World War Two: As Seen by U.S. Naval Intelligence [Baker, A. D.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Japanese Naval Vessels of World War Two: As Seen by U.S. Naval Intelligence/5(4). Japanese Naval Vessels of World War Two as Seen by U.S.

Naval Intelligence book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. A WWII referenc 3/5(1). 11 rows  This List of Japanese Navy ships and war vessels in World War II is a list of seafaring. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Japanese Naval Vessels of World War Two: As Seen by Intelligence by Orion Publishing Co (Hardback, ) at the best online prices at eBay.

Free delivery for many products. Foreword. In January the Chief of Staff, U.S. Army, and Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Navy agreed that the formation of a joint committee to assess enemy Naval and merchant shipping losses during World War II would be desirable.

The United States Navy grew rapidly during World War II from –45, and played a central role in the war against Japan. It also assisted the British Royal Navy in the naval war against Germany and Italy.

The U.S. Navy grew slowly in the years prior to World War II, due in part to international limitations on naval operations in the s.

Battleship production restarted in About this Item: White Lotus, Hardcover. Condition: Fine. Japanese Naval Vessels At the End of World War II is a very simple form of a record of all combatant vessels and the representative minor miscellaneous vessels inclusive of special attack crafts of he ex-Imperial Japanese Navy at the termination of the war.

After recently reading Requiem for Battleship Yamato by Yoshida Mitsuru, a recounting of the sad career of one of the two super battleships of the Imperial Japanese navy in World War II, and Tin Can Sailor: Life Aboard the USS Sterett, by C.

Raymond Calhoun, which can be viewed as an American counterpart to the book under review, I /5. In January the Chief of Staff, U.S. Army, and Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Navy agreed that the formation of a joint committee to assess enemy Naval and merchant shipping losses during World War II would be desirable.

Accordingly the JOINT ARMY-NAVY ASSESSMENT COMMITTEE was. Japanese Intelligence in World War II, Stephen C. Mercado. The old Italian complaint concerning the near impossibility of faithfully translating form and content from one language to another, traduttore, traditore (translator, traitor), comes to mind in reading Japanese Intelligence in World War II.

Kotani Ken, an intelligence expert at the Japanese Ministry of Defense’s National Institute. Skilled Intelligence Officer in World War II Foresaw Japan's Plans, but Annoyed Navy Brass SummerVol. 40, No.

2 By David A. Pfeiffer Capt. Ellis M. Zacharias (Papers of Ellis M. Zacharias) Ellis Zacharias sipped on his dry martini as he matched poker skills with a group that included a young naval attaché with the Japanese embassy.

Zacharias, a naval intelligence officer posted in. Japanese Naval Shipbuilding. Information from official sources is now available on the details of Japanese Naval shipbuilding from early almost to the end of Captured documents had previously provided a complete list of official Navy announcements of new construction and conversions (TATSU) from 5 February to 10 May ☆ For sale: GERMAN NAVAL VESSELS of WORLD WAR TWO Compiled by Naval Intelligence with an introduction by A.

BAKER lll. ☆ More than 1, illustrations depict the warships of the German Navy during the Second World War in this formerly Restricted document. ONI I JAPANESE NAVAL VESSELS VOLUME 2: WWII By Office Of Naval Intelligence. $ Free shipping. JAPANESE NAVAL VESSELS OF WORLD WAR TWO: AS SEEN BY U.S. By A.

Baker *VG+* $ Free shipping. The Sacred Stone Circles of Seller Rating: % positive. Japanese naval vessels of World War Two: as seen by US Naval Intelligence.

introduction by A.D. Baker III. Poole: Arms and Armour Press, Poole: Arms and Armour Press, ISBN Two Japanese naval vessels, left foreground, at Yokosuka Naval Base near Yokohama, directly in the path of bombs from Maj.

Gen. James Doolittle's raiders, Ap (AP Photo/U.S. Army). The Imperial Japanese Navy, much like every other Navy at the time, had to rely on intelligence gathered from pilots, observers, surface vessel and submarine crews, and, at times, land based observers.

Observation and identification of vessels at. WW2 Japanese Warships and Submarines () For a time, the Empire of Japan managed one of the most prolific naval forces anywhere in the world - though the Allies would eventually render its.

Introduction by H. Train, Captain, U. Navy, writes that this is the first time ONI was issued in loose leaf form so it could be incorporated into the standard U. Navy Task Binder. This book contains both aerial views and surfaces views of the Japanese navy vessels. World War II, United States Breaking of Japanese Naval Codes MICHAEL J.

O'NEAL On December 7,Japanese military forces attacked the United States naval fleet anchored at Pearl Harbor on the Hawaiian island of Oahu.

The surprise attack was devastating to the U.S. Navy. Nearly every American plane on Oahu was destroyed; three cruisers, three destroyers, and eight battleships were severely.

While contemporary naval affairs are Ben’s main research interests, World War Two naval history will always have a special place in his heart as it reminds him of his childhood days reading up. japanese naval vessels at the end of the war by shizuo fukui (dated ap - corrected jan, ).

introduction by fukui from jan, indicates that this rare edition was produced because the originals were an official & restricted report distributed to allied officials only, and that he himself decided to make blue print copies for his friends, which this edition appears to Rating: % positive.

When the last Japanese plane winged away, at about A.M., eighteen U.S. naval vessels, including eight battleships, had been sunk or heavily damaged. More than aircraft were destroyed. Timothy D. Saxon, “Anglo-Japanese Naval Cooperation, –,” Naval War College Rev no.

1 (Winter ). [3] Saxon, “Anglo-Japanese Naval Cooperation.” [4] Tadashi Nakatani, “What Peace Meant to Japan: The Changeover at Paris in ,” in The Decade of the Great War: Japan and the Wider World in the s, ed. by Tosh. “US Naval Intelligence and the Imperial Japanese Fleet during the Washington Treaty Era, c.

” The Mariner’s Mirror (): Hone, Trent. American History: US-Japan Relations Before World War Two Japanese soldiers raise their flag over the central government building in Nanking after seizing the city in Author: VOA Learning English.

- Explore aircombat_'s board "UNITED STATES & JAPANESE NAVAL BATTLES OF WORLD WAR 2", followed by people on Pinterest. See pins.

In Octobernaval intelligence officer Ellis M. Zacharias found himself in the same apartment building as the Japanese naval attache Captain Yoshitake Uyeda, a dashing figure on the Washington social scene and long suspected by ONI to be an agent of the Joho Kyoko (Japanese Naval Intelligence).

Whatever it may have been, it was not enough to change the outcome of the war. Ken’ichi later wrote a book about his work, Joho shikan no kaiso (Reminiscence of an intelligence officer), originally published in This is the second of two parts on Axis intel successes in World War II.

Click here to read part 1, German Intelligence Successes. For almost 20 years, more than reels of microfilmed Japanese naval records remained in the custody of the U.S. Naval History Division, virtually untouched.

This unique book draws on those sources and others to tell the story of the Pacific War from the viewpoint of the Japanese.

Former Marine Corps officer and Asian scholar Paul Dull focuses on the major surface engagements 3/5(5). My own particular interests focus on intelligence and understanding the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, a subject that I have researched since age twelve.

I selected Britain’s War: Into Battle to review in order to learn more about this era and, especially, British perspectives on the United States prior to 7 December   ONI was founded in and already served as “the main provider of data on foreign fleets” for U.S.

policymakers on the eve of the conference. 7 Just as with the rest of the U.S. Navy, the First World War had led to a significant expansion of ONI manpower, swelling to reservists and 18 civil servants by 8 ONI’s mission was to. No. The Japanese had, arguably, better submarines; they certainly had better torpedoes (Germany, like the US, was hamstrung by unreliable torpedoes for the first year or two of the war, while Japan and Britain had tested theirs much more thoroughl.

During the Second World War, there were 56 submarines larger than 3, tons in the entire world, and 52 of these were Japanese. Japan built 65 submarines with ranges exceed miles at ten knots, while the Allies had no submarine capable of this feat.

ByJapan had built all 39 of the world's diesel-electric submarines with more. During World War I, the Japanese honored their British alliance against the Chinese providing the Brits with naval support. As a strategic ally, Japan expected more recognition, and soon became one of the five countries — Britain, France, the USA, Italy, and.

The translation activities of OPFE trailed off after mid-November On Decem it published a translation related to the Japanese Special Naval Police Force and on January 2, it published a list of intelligence reports issued by the Japanese Naval General Staff.

Instead of an illustrious career as a warship, the Katsuragi was used to demobilize the armed forces of the Empire of Japan on islands bypassed by U.S. forces during the war.

You can read the history here, but the BLUF is that at the end of World War II, the bulk of the Imperial Japanese navy was either sunk or inoperable. Out of what was once. This is a book about military intelligence in the Pacific during is not a mystery or work of fiction,but an account of what went on in the gathering and distribution of information by someone who was intimately involved from the beginning to the of all,this is not a new was written in ,34 years after the hed by Naval Institute Press,also a Book Club Cited by: 3.As I noted in the previous piece, the World War II Database has some historical accounts of U.S.

personnel marveling at how big the ship was when they encountered it a few years later in : Prashanth Parameswaran.

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